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Young protester shot dead during June 3 Massacre commemorations

June 4 - 2022 KHARTOUM
'We won't forget, we won't forgive' - Call by University of Khartoum lecturers to join the June 3 Massacre commemorations (Social media)
'We won't forget, we won't forgive' - Call by University of Khartoum lecturers to join the June 3 Massacre commemorations (Social media)

The Central Committee of Sudan Doctors yesterday reported the death of a twenty-year-old demonstrator in Khartoum during his participation in the commemorations of what has become known as the 2019 June 3 Massacre.

The victim was shot in the chest in El Sahafa in Khartoum, the doctors committee said in a press statement on Friday evening.

This brings the total number of people killed during pro-democracy demonstrations in Sudan since the military took full power again in a coup d’état on October 25 last year, to 99.

On Thursday, at least 20 people were injured, 13 of them by gunshots, in demonstrations calling for the participation in commemorations of the third anniversary of the 2019 June 3 Massacre.

On June 3, 2019, two days before the end of Ramadan, the large sit-in in front of the army command, was broken up with excessive violence. At least 127 protesters were reportedly killed. About 40 bodies were found floating in the Nile. More than 700 others sustained injuries, and at least 100 people went missing.

Since December 2018, thousands of Sudanese demonstrated to pressure the then ruling Omar Al Bashir to step down. On April 6, the protesters set up a large sit-in in front of the military command in central Khartoum. Five days later, the dictator was deposed in a military coup. However, protesters continued to occupy the space in front of the Ministry of Defence to demand the military to cede power to a civilian government.

Two months later, on June 3/Ramadan 29, the people at the sit-in were brutally attacked by government forces. In November that year, Human Rights Watch condemned in a 59-page report the “use of disproportionate, excessive force to disperse protests in violent repeated crackdowns”.

The committee of inquiry set up by the then Prime minister Abdallah Hamdok in October 2019, earlier this year suspended its investigations. The head of the committee, Nabil Adib, told Radio Dabanga last month that it would be “impossible for foreign teams to examine the evidence while an independent civilian government is absent”.

 


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