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‘Sudan authorities’ denial of cholera a crime’: Activist

May 11 - 2017 WHITE NILE STATE
People are avoiding fruit and vegetables for fear of infection with cholera (File photo)
People are avoiding fruit and vegetables for fear of infection with cholera (File photo)

Civil society Organisations in Sudan’s White Nile state have reported that at least 20 people have died of cholera and 1,180 others have been infected in the state, saying ‘the authorities’ non-recognition of cholera is a crime’.

On Sunday, activists from these organisations told Radio Dabanga that the number of victims is even greater than that in the areas where the disease has spread.

Yesterday Abdelrahman El Siddig, the head of civil society organisations in White Nile, explained to Radio Dabanga from Rabak that the last deaths caused by cholera were a man and a woman at El Gezira Aba on Wednesday.

He pointed out to the emergence of 91 cases at El Hilla El Jadeeda, west of Rabak and 26 other cases at the villages of Hashaba, El Mileih, and Badriya.

He pointed out that there are more than 50 cases still being held in isolation at Maaz Bin Jebel School in Rabak receiving treatment until Wednesday.

He said: “the authorities’ non-recognition of cholera is a crime.

Deteriorating

“The situation is still deteriorating, although the authorities have sprayed the districts next to Maaz Bin Jebel School and provided some medicines. Several villages have complained of a lack of intravenous fluids and tonic.”

He pointed to the growing concern of the state's population about the spread of deadly infection as many people have stopped eating vegetables and fruits.

The White Nile state Health Ministry warned of the danger of the spread of cholera infection.

The Ministry said in a report that the infection is doubly alarming as it has included all the nine localities of the state.

The report said that the daily visit to the treatment centres ranges between 40 to 60 cases.


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