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Sudan's Consumer Protection Association calls attention to electricity and oil issues

May 17 - 2022 KHARTOUM / PORT SUDAN
People waiting to buy fuel at a petrol station station in El Fasher during a shortage in 2020 (social media)
People waiting to buy fuel at a petrol station station in El Fasher during a shortage in 2020 (social media)

The Consumer Protection Association joined a group of organisations and individuals who filed an official complaint in Khartoum against the doubling of the electricity tariffs for household consumption since April and called on “all those affected to join the complaint”. The association further reported on the smuggling of large quantities of oil that does not meet the country's quality standards.

Yasir Mirghani, head of the Consumer Protection Association, said in an interview with Radio Dabanga’s Sudan Today programme, that the association denounces the doubling of electricity tariffs for household consumption “without any justifications”.

Mirghani also criticised the “suspicious silence” of electrical engineers and technicians surrounding the price increase.

The association also told Radio Dabanga about the reported smuggling of large quantities of petrol to the Sudanese markets after a ship entered the country with petrol of which the quality was not in accordance with the prevailing standards in the country.

Mirghani said that the Ministry of Oil formed a committee to investigate how the non-conforming petrol ship was allowed to enter the country and called on the ministry to include the Consumer Protection Association in the committee.

He said that there was another vessel importing oil from the same company that also carried non-conforming petrol. Mirghani explained that the Khartoum Refinery had proven that the petrol did not conform to the official standards.

He further explained that the company itself analysed the petrol in another laboratory to prove the quality standards, but that the authorities in Port Sudan refused to approve those results.

Sudan has witnessed protests against the soaring costs of living, including oil and energy prices, and against environmental pollution caused by oil extraction activities. 


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