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Sudan official: ‘No contact with people kidnapped in Libya’

December 7 - 2019 KHARTOUM
Sudanese prisoners in Libya, July 2018 (RD file photo)
Sudanese prisoners in Libya, July 2018 (RD file photo)

According to a Sudanese official, communication has been lost with 11 Sudanese nationals detained by human traffickers in Libya.

The victims are reportedly being held in the region of Bani Walid in north-east Libya, Malek El Dejawi, working for the Programme for Voluntary Repatriation of Sudanese Communities in Libya, said in a press statement on Thursday.

They spent three months in a camp where they were subjected to the worst forms of psychological and physical torture, he added.

Human traffickers are demanding a ransom of SDG 2 billion ($ 44.445 *) for their release.

The relatives of the victims now appeal to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Sudanese Embassy in Libya and human rights organisations “to quickly intervene to release our sons”.

El Dejawi said the Programme managed to release 16 Sudanese three months ago, after paying a ransom of SDG 3 billion.

On Wednesday, Lt Col Khalid Abdoun of the Sudanese-Libyan Joint Forces reported that his men recovered 145 Sudanese citizens who were deported by the Libyan authorities.

He said the evacuees, who were tortured by Libyan gangs holding them, have been transferred to Dongola, capital of the Northern State, until they can be reunited with their families.

As effective foreign exchange rates can vary in Sudan, Radio Dabanga bases all SDG currency conversions on the daily US Dollar rate quoted by the Central Bank of Sudan (CBoS).

 


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