Skip to main content
Independent news from the heart of Sudan
Watch live

Families of September protest victims raise demands

March 6 - 2015 KHARTOUM
Cars burning in front of a building in Khartoum during the demonstrations against the lifting of fuel subsidies in September 2013 (HRW)
Cars burning in front of a building in Khartoum during the demonstrations against the lifting of fuel subsidies in September 2013 (HRW)

Family members of martyrs of the September 2013 demonstrations in Khartoum have formed a committee to raise their demands to the Sudanese government, to try the murderers and compensate the families of the martyrs.

Abdel Bagi El Khidir El Amin, father of the martyr Sarra, told Dabanga that the families of the dead and wounded have waited for seventeen months for the inquiry committee, formed by the government, to bring them justice and prosecute the killers. “To no avail.”

He pointed out that all the cases are filed against persons they do not know, and in mysterious circumstances. The dead were hit by bullets in fatal parts of the body, which confirm the shooter was a professional, El Amin claims.

“That is why the martyrs' families have formed this committee, to follow up their cause inside and outside Sudan, in collaboration with those concerned, in order to bring justice to them.” He said that he has been assigned as chairman. Raja Mohamed, the mother of martyr Shogi El Rayyah, is assigned with the coordination of the committee.

The committee will gather all the families of the people who were killed during demonstrations in the Sudanese capital against the lifting of fuel subsidies in one body. According to the Sudanese opposition forces, more than 200 demonstrators in Khartoum died of bullet wounds to their heads and chests. Activists said at the time that hundreds were injured, and about 2,000 protesters were detained.

Related articles:

Sudan security threatens families of protest victims (21 September 2014)

Biggest protest in Sudan since beginning of Bashir regime (27 September 2013)


Back to overview